Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: 90% seat, 8% leg, 2% rein. The formula for success.

Monday, December 30, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: Many of life's failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up. - Thomas Edison

Friday, December 20, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: Don't criticize; Teach, share, learn. Be the cure, not the problem.

Thursday, December 19, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: When riding focus on your horse and the task at hand. You will be surprised at how focused and relaxed your horse will be when YOUR not worried and looking around. Horses like a competent leader.

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: The two hardest things to handle in life are failure and success.

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: Green(horse) + Green(rider) = Black and Blue

Monday, December 16, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: Shut up, Work hard, Be patient.

Friday, December 13, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: Success begins with can, failure begins with can't. - Billy Cox

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: When it comes to horsemanship knowledge and ability, everybody starts out equally at zero. How far you go from there is entirely up to you. Winning is what you make of it. - Bob Avila

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: One mans wrong lead, is another's counter canter.

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: The horse can only pull, if there is something to pull against. If your horse is pulling on you, the answer is not a bigger or more severe bit, your hands are most likely the problem, not the bit.  - Steve Kutie

Monday, December 9, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: Legit, either work hard or you might as well quit. - MC Hammer

Friday, December 6, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: Confidence is preparation, everything else is beyond your control.

Wednesday, December 4, 2013

Wisdom Wdenesday

Wisdom Wednesday: Real success, is when you overcome the fear of not being successful.

Tuesday, December 3, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: Worry less about how high or low your horses head is and start worrying about leaving your horse alone. His head and neck will relax when you stop trying to force it down.

Monday, December 2, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: Today I will do what others won't, so tomorrow I can accomplish what others can't. - Jerry Rice

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: Draw reins, tie downs, martingales etc... are gimmicks that just stick a bandage over the problem. A wound does not heal faster just because you apply more bandages to the cut. Learn how to better understand horse mechanics and function to fix the true issue and stop using gimmicks, not only will it improve your skills and knowledge, your horse will thank you. Remember it is more fun to be a rider than just a passenger. - Steve Kutie

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: When it comes to training there is no right or wrong in terms of technique. Training has to be what works for you, and what your horse understands. Training is all about consistency and always asking the question the same every time, and rewarding him for trying or giving the correct answer. If you teach your horse to pick up the left lead by pulling on his left ear, and you are consistent with your aids and your horse responds willing, that is training, it's just not very marketable or practical, but it is training.

Monday, November 25, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: Faster, Faster, until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death.

Friday, November 22, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: Think too much and you will create a problem that was not there in the first place.

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: Trying to be perfect, sometimes gets in the way of being good. - Steve Kutie

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: If you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, you will always be disappointed. Instead, just go with it, just accept it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it. - Mica Angela Hendricks

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: Focus on YOUR horses needs in the warm up pen before you show, this is where your run is won or lost. Remember what everyone else is doing has nothing to do with you. - Steve Kutie

Monday, November 18, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: Mediocrity doesn't pay well. - Steve Kutie

Friday, November 15, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: If it's important to you, you will find a way. Otherwise you will find an excuse.

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: There are those that will let nothing stop them, and there are those that have nothing but excuses.

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: It has long since come to my attention that people of accomplishment rarely sit back and let things happen to them. They went out and happened to things. - Leonardo DaVinci

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: The hardest part of training is being focused and patient enough to ask/show the horse what we want in the same manner over and over and over and over without either one of you getting confused. - Steve Kutie

Monday, November 11, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: Those who never take risks, can only see other peoples failures.

Friday, November 8, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: Most people would rather be certain they're miserable, than risk being happy. - Robert Anthony

Thursday, November 7, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: The things you take for granted... someone else is praying for.

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: When the only tool you have is a hammer; every problem becomes a nail. - Maslow

Monday, November 4, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: I am not the next of them, I am the first of me. - Hoobastanck

Friday, November 1, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: The difference between a successful person and others is not the lack of strength, not a lack of knowledge, but rather a lack of will. - Vince Lombardi

Thursday, October 31, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: You start to become a horseman when you realize it's all your fault, not your horse's.

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: The horse is the best judge of a good rider, not the spectator. If a horse has a high opinion of the rider, he will let himself be guided, if not he will resist. - Nuno Oliveria

Friday, October 25, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: In training, the fastest way to get there, is to never take the shortcut. - Steve Kutie

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: Ask and encourage, never force. - Steve Kutie

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: Any time you work with your horse, either you are training the horse or the horse is training you.

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: Countless unseen details are often the only difference between mediocre and magnificent.

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: When the going gets tough; Shut up, do your job, and work harder.

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: At some point during the training process your going to have to ask for more than your horse is capable, to find his limits/potential. Nothing is worse than a horse or rider that has all-star ability that is unused. - Steve Kutie

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: Another drawback, specific to dealing with Zombies, is that horses are notoriously spooked by the undead. Even the scent of a Zombie, carried by the wind and maybe miles from the source, will be enough to send most horses into hysterics. - The Zombie Survival Guide
ATTENTION: Kutie Performance Horses happened to specialize in getting your trusty steed Zombie broke. Please feel free to give us a call, your life might depend on it.

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: Draw reins, ties downs, martingales etc... are gimmicks that just stick a bandage over the problem. A wound does not heal faster just because you apply more bandages to the cut. Learn how to better understand horse mechanics and function to fix the true issue, and stop using gimmicks, not only will you improve your skills and knowledge, your horse will thank you. Remember that it is more fun to be a rider than just a passenger.

Friday, October 4, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: Those who never take risks, can only see other peoples failures.

Thursday, October 3, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: Expect more out of your horse at home than at a horse show. Ask 110% at home and 90% at a show, this way you will always have enough horse and he won't dread going into the show pen. - Steve Kutie

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday:  If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. - Albert Einstein

Friday, September 27, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: Fear is a liar.

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: The best way to appreciate how another person rides, is to get on their horse. Also, never judge another riders skills or abilities until you have ridden their horse.

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday:   Patience [pey-shuh ns], n; 1. The quality of being patient, as the bearing of provocation, annoyance, misfortune, or pain, without complaint, loss of temper, irritation, or the like. 2. The only way to become successful in the horse business.

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: All showing is, is crisis management. Those that can handle the situations best, wins. - Steve Kutie

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: The mightiest oak tree was once just a little nut that that held it's ground.

A True Champion

Tonight I had the pleasure of having Arvilla Ketchum Taylor, the 1959 Olympic Qualifier Winner for Eventing, hanging out in the barn. Also found out that she did not get to compete in the Olympics do to being a woman, thank goodness times have changed.

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Tech Tip Teusday

Tech Tip Tuesday: The only way to train a horse is to accept what he is giving you and guide them toward your goal. - Steve Kutie

Monday, September 16, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: If it's important to you, you will find a way. Otherwise you will find an excuse.

Friday, September 13, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: Jealousy is the inability to appreciate what we have.

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: Don't let someone who gave up on their dreams talk you out of going after yours.

Wednesday, September 11, 2013


Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: Don't put your responsibility with other people, like the judges. Have you done your utmost best, have you done everything? If so, you never lose. - Tjalling Van de Berg/ pertaining to being fit and in shape to improve your riding.

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: One mans wrong lead, is another's counter canter.

Monday, September 9, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: Life's a garden, dig it.

Friday, September 6, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: Poll flexion is not pull flexion. - Thomas Ritter

Thursday, September 5, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: A smooth sea never made a sailor; A perfect horse never made a horseman; Be thankful for difficult horses.

Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: It's a good day to have a good day.

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: Never cut corners or try to save money on tack or equipment that will effect your life, such as reins, headstalls, or cinches. Your life is more valuable than saving $20 on a pair of reins.

Friday, August 30, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: With foundation work, you create a happy mind in your horse that allows you to do the hard stuff later. Lisa  Wilcox

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: Good training is all about teaching a horse what to do. Not, what not to do.

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: 10 Steps to follow for correct training:
1. Rhythm
2. Relaxation
3. Freedom of Gaits
4. Contact
5. Straightness
6. Balance
7. Impulsion
8. Suppleness
9. On the Aids
10. Collection

Monday, August 26, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: You're AWESOME!

Friday, August 23, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: Countless unseen details, are often the only difference between mediocre and magnificent.

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: The hardest part of training is being focused and patient enough to ask/show the horse what we want in the same manner over, and over, and over without either one of you getting confused. - Steve Kutie

Monday, August 19, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: A person is not finished when he's defeated. They are finished when they quit.

Friday, August 16, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: Thousands of geniuses live and die undiscovered - either by themselves or by others. - Mark Twain

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: Remember when your lazy, someone is out riding.
                          Remember when it's raining, someone is out riding.
                          Remember when it's hot, someone is out riding.
                          Remember when it's freezing, someone is out riding.
                          Remember when your making excuses, someone is riding to WIN!
                          Remember Winning takes COMMITMENT.

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Have Fun My Friends


Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger.

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: In good training you never see the rider do anything.

Monday, August 12, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: Happy Horse = Happy Rider.

Friday, August 9, 2013

CONGRATULATIONS

Congratulations to Roberta Johnston, and Buzz for winning the DSRP Versatility/SHOT Riding Series, Ltd. Non Pro Title. Great Job!

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you react to it.

Thursday, August 8, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: Don't take out your frustrations from a bad day at work, or the last horse's training problems out on the horse that your currently riding, he doesn't deserve it. - Steve Kutie

Wednesday, August 7, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: Horse training is a wonderful life, if one does not have to make a living at it.

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: When it comes to training there is no right or wrong in terms of technique. Training has to be what works for you, and what your horse understands. Training is all about consistency and always asking the question the same every time and rewarding him for trying or giving the correct answer. If you teach your horse to pick up the left lead by pulling on his left ear and your consistent with your aids and your horse responds willingly, that is training, it's just not very marketable or practical, but it's training. - Steve Kutie

Monday, August 5, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: Most people would rather be certain they're miserable , than risk being happy.

Friday, August 2, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: What you put up with, you end up with.

Thursday, August 1, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: When looking to purchase a Reining/Cow Horse/ Cutter prospect; You buy the stop, the rest can be trained. A horse that WANTS to stop, will always beat a horse that has to be MADE to stop.

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: Never let your past experiences harm your future. You're past can't be altered and your future doesn't deserve the punishment.

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: Excerpt from an upcoming article.  Improving Performance; A Weighty Issue                                                                                           
  I am always hearing people trying to come up with ways to improve the performance of their horses or themselves by changing their feeding program, adding supplements, or buying some sort of a new fangled gimmick to gain some sort of a competitive edge. The easiest and cheapest way to gain an edge in your performance is to BECOME FIT! I know that we all have seen or heard of how we need to maintain proper riding position with a vertical line being drawn through our ear, shoulder, hip and heel. We have had our coaches and trainers riding us like a rented mule about keeping our shoulders back and our head up. And can you remember what the reason was? It was due to the fact that our heads have a certain amount of weight, some more than others, and when that weight falls in front of the vertical line we throw our horses out of balance. So riddle yourself this question; if your head weighing 8-10 lbs. is enough weight to throw your horse out of balance, how can being over weight or out of shape not effect you and your horses ability? 

Monday, July 29, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: No matter how good of a person you are, there will always be someone criticizing you. Always stay true to yourself.

Friday, July 26, 2013

Fun Working Horses

Kai and mom watching Dad and Teryn Muench working horses.

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: There is only one correct answer to all questions in horsemanship; It depends on the horse.

Thursday, July 25, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: When the going gets tough, shut up, do your job and work harder.

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: Whips and spurs are training aids, not weapons.

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

We Start em Young


Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: The biggest misunderstanding is that when a horse has his head down, neck arched, and is flexed at the poll, that he is collected. The good news is that your horse is framed up, the bad news is he is not collected. The only way a horse can be truly collected, is to be allowed to move FORWARD into a light soft hand and have drive and impulsion coming from behind  (Think about riding a tube of toothpaste, you have to squeeze from the back of the tube to get the toothpaste out). The drive from behind allows the shoulders and front legs to become lighter and starts the beginning of self carriage/collection.  Without FORWARD movement there can never be collection, the horse can be framed up, but never collected.

Monday, July 22, 2013

Happy Happy Happy

Yay! Got the new mare home, aka "Fergie". Once again,.Steve Kutie of Steve Kutie Performance Horses has worked his magic. Thanks Steve! We love the mare. My turn next LOL

Forward Fixes Everything

The simplest and easiest way to fix most of your training issues is to understand the concept that your horse has to be moving FORWAR...D from your leg. Anytime your horse loses steering or doesn't cross over cleanly in a spin is usually due to your horse not moving FORWARD into the bridle. The key to keeping your horse moving FORWARD into the bridle is to understand that you have to ride your horse FORWARD with your legs out to the bit rather than pulling the bit back to the horse. Your legs are what create the drive and impulsion in your horse; basically, you need to think that the more you squeeze with your legs the more the horse will drive up under himself, your left leg controls his left hind leg and your right leg controls his right hind leg. You have to understand that the more leg you use DOES NOT mean your horse speeds up, more leg means more drive and impulsion creating more lift and lightness, never more speed.

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: Our fears are more numerous than our dangers, and we suffer more in our imagination than in reality.

Friday, July 19, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: There are no severe bits, just severe hands. Any bit that you place in your horses mouth will never cause harm or pain on it's own, the riders hand will ALWAYS be the determining factor in the severity of the bit. Remember that a bit is only as mild or severe as the riders hands that are using it. - Steve Kutie

Thursday, July 18, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: If you don't know about pain and trouble, you're in sad shape. They make you appreciate life.- Evil Knievel

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: Draw reins, tie downs, martingales etc... are gimmicks that just stick a bandage over the problem. A wound does not heal faster just because you apply more bandages to the cut. Learn how to better understand horse mechanics and function to fix the true issue and stop using gimmicks. Not only will it improve your skills and knowledge, your horse will thank you.

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: Some horses are blind, you need to make the opening of the tunnel bigger so they can see the light... make the right decision easy and obvious, make the wrong decision difficult and hard work. Help them make the decision and don't make them afraid to make a mistake when answering your question. - Steve Kutie

Monday, July 15, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: There is a huge amount of freedom that comes to you when you take nothing personally.

Friday, July 12, 2013

Your Husband said it was OK

Your husband called and said that it was OK to send your horse to Kutie Performance Horses to make him a Champion. We currently have a training spot available, contact us for more info.

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: They can buy palaces, they can buy the best horses, they can buy the best trainers, but they can't buy a seat.... they can't buy that. They have to earn it. - George Morris
Your preaching to choir George.

Thursday, July 11, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: The difference between a successful person and other is not the lack of strength, not a lack of knowledge, but rather a lack of will. - Vince Lombardi

Bonus Training Tip; Bare Backing is not the Answer


Bare backing is not the answer



I have heard people tell me the best way to learn how to ride with a balanced seat is to practice riding bare back, aka saddle-less. I believe this is one of the biggest lies in the business. Sometimes I think most people just like to do whatever their friends are doing or whatever their uncle's first cousin's best friend's brother-in-law who had a miniature pony and couldn't ride might have to say about the proper use of their seat.

The biggest problem I have found with riding bare back is that your seat makes up 90% of the riding equation (90% seat, 8% leg, 2% rein), so the mechanics of riding with no saddle really only teache you to grip with your legs causing your seat to lighten and lift from the horses back and basically rendering your seat useless. In addition, it encourages you to stay in position by hanging on to the reins in order to help balance yourself. Sounds like it really helps, huh?

I understand that there will be a bunch of people that will try to say that it works, and it might have been the way that they started. However, what they have forgotten about is all of the time they have spent with trainers,and taking lessons to overcome most of the problems that riding without a saddle causes. Also, your heels will naturally rise up and your toes will point down in an effort to stay on by gripping. If your horse moves too quickly, your natural human reaction is to hold on, whether it be with the reins or your legs. As for me, I cannot blame you, because the last place I want to be is laying on the ground under my horse.

I believe the best way to learn how to use your seat properly is to spend time in a dressage saddle having a lunge lesson at least 2 days minimum per week. It doesn't make a difference to me which discipline you ride; I believe that the proper Dressage basics will take you further than any other thing you can do. But you have to remember that you really need to find a trainer that understands the theory and basic applications of having an independent seat and legs. Just as in any other discipline, there will always be good and bad trainers and instructors that do not truly understand, so be sure to do your homework and find a trainer that is well schooled in the basics of Dressage.

Now as a trainer myself, I spend time taking lunge lessons and going to ride with other top professionals outside of my discipline to continually improve my seat, position and riding. When you think that you know it all and can't get any better, it is time to hang up your spurs.

If you want to see if your seat is really working, go to a fenced in arena, or round pen, by yourself, pull off your bridle (don't cheat by using a neck rope) and start asking your horse for transitions, both up and down. Think you have that mastered? Try it with another horse and rider in the arena. It is easy to keep your horse listening when you're alone, now up the ante and see how it goes. I guarantee this exercise will be the most frustrating, yet truly beneficial, exercise from which you can learn.

Learning to ride properly with just seat and legs is like having your friend ask you about your dating relationship. You know, 'Do you love him, or do you love him love him?' Most people will have ridden a horse at some time in their lives, but that does not make them a rider. There is a big difference between being a rider that actually is able to influence the movements of the horse they are riding, and a rider that sits on the back of a horse as a passenger. A trained monkey can sit up on a trained horse and go where the horse wants to go, but it takes a rider to convey their thoughts to a horse in such a subtle way that it looks so natural that the horse looks like he is performing the required maneuvers on his own.

With the level of competition getting so good and the margins of victory becoming smaller and smaller, it is getting more important to utilize what you have in your training tool box that you are allowed to take into the show ring and doesn’t cost you a penny. Bonus is your horse will thank you for becoming his partner rather than treating him like a prisoner on the Maricopa County chain gang.



As Always.....Ride Hard, Be Safe and Have Fun. - Steve Kutie

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Eating Breakfast in Style


Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough. - Mae West

Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: Patience, n ; 2 The capacity to accept or tolerate delay, trouble, or suffering without getting upset or angry, also the only way to become successful in the horse business.

Monday, July 8, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: Unless you faint and die, keep going. If you just faint, when you come to get going. - Steve Kutie

Sunday, July 7, 2013

Helpful Horse Training Tips

These are Carl's 35 top tips on everything dressage - from finding the right horse, to training ...and stable management techniques:

1 Dressage is not just for competition. It is gymnastics for horses and all horses can benefit from it, as they are more likely to stay sound with a long, stretchy neck, soft body and easy movement.

2 You don't have to spend a fortune on a horse for dressage - as long as the basic paces are there, the rest can be acheived through training. The main paces to look at are walk and canter, as with a bit of work a horse with a very normal trot can trot beautifully.

In walk, the horse should use the whole of his body and have a good overtrack, where the hind foot lands in front of the print left by the front foot. A good canter has a bounding stride, with the hindleg jumping right underneath the horse and the front end lifted. Above all, though a good, natural rhythm is essential and is always more important than big movement.

3 When a horse is tired, he’ll try to stretch down. Let him do it for a while as it’s something you want to encourage. To stretch your horse, lengthen the rein, lower your hand and massage his mouth with the bit by gently squeezing and releasing each rein. Stretch him regularly throughout your training sessions to relax him and reduce the risk of tension.

4 In canter always ride forward – imagine there’s a big jump at the end of the long side that you’re going to take on!

5 Dressage is about repetition, repeating exercises over and over again until it becomes part of the horse’s way of going. It takes dedication, but is simply about producing a well-schooled horse – something we’d all like to have!

6 Even if your thing is dressage, mix your horse’s schooling up with hacking and jumping as it will keep him relaxed and interested.

7 Always compete at the level below the one you are working on at home, so that you are able to cope at the competition where there are many more distractions.

8 Mirrors are a huge help in training as they enable you to see what your horse is doing – for example, how do you know whether he is straight without being able to see him?

9 Working-in is one of the most important aspects of dressage. You want your horse to be long, round and stretching before you start more taxing work, to get the muscles in front of and behind the saddle soft and working – gymnasts don’t hop straight onto the top bar! Ideally, walk for 10 minutes to start with, but if your horse is fresh, it is best to trot on to settle him down.

10 Your horse must work in front of the leg. This means that he should move forward of his own accord and not expect you to keep motivating him – for example, if you ask for canter, he must learn to stay in canter without any leg pressure, until you tell him otherwise.

11 If your horse is not responsive to your leg, ask for halt and with a loose rein, give him sharp quick taps with your leg until he moves forward – it doesn’t matter what pace he goes into, just let him move forward.

12 Create a work station on your yard, where everything to do with work happens – for example, tacking up and washing off – and keep his stable for relaxation only. Then your horse knows he can totally relax when he’s in his stable and won’t be expected to work.

13 If your horse is too sensitive to the leg, work on lots of downward transitions.

14 Lots of transitions between canter and trot will help to improve the trot by getting him to carry more weight on his back end.

15 To maintain balance while you’re working your horse, use lots of half-halts. Think about using one before you ask your horse to do anything.

16 Give your horse sugar during training sessions as a reward and to help him mouth the bit, which will encourage him to salivate and make him lighter in the hand.

17 Riding your horse ‘on and back’ involves asking him for a few lengthened strides before asking him to come back to his working pace, then repeating it several times. This will help you to get him to carry his head and neck, and achieve self-carriage.

18 When doing tempi changes – a series of flying changes – with more advanced horses, we ride along the wall of the arena to help keep the horse straight.

19 With a horse who is trained to do collected canter, you want to aim for a speed where someone can walk alongside you.

20 Use leg-yield in canter to make your horse more aware of your legs.

21 To help you maintain the rhythm while riding, keep a song in your head and sing it to yourself while you ride.

22 Get someone to video you riding so you can see what’s working and where things are going wrong. Sometimes it’s more beneficial than having someone on the floor telling you what you’re doing wrong.

23 A good trot is all about suspension. When our horses are strong enough, we teach passage and use it to get suspension in the trot. We rise while doing this exercise, as it makes it easier for the horse and encourages lift. From passage, we take the trot forward until he realises that he needs to keep the suspension that he had in passage. If he loses the suspension, we halt, ask for passage and then try it again until he maintains the suspension in trot.

24 As a test of your training technique, go into rising trot and drop your reins. Your horse should stretch down, but if he sticks his head up, something needs adjusting in your training.

25 Never tell your horse off when teaching him flying changes, just keep repeating them until he gets it right, or he’ll start to get nervous and tense about doing them.

26 If you can’t halt square on the centre line, it’s your fault! It requires training, so to make sure you can do this, teach your horse that he must always stand square, even for mounting and dismounting. To teach your horse to stand square, ask for it along the side of the school. Trot, ask for a few steps of walk, then step forward into halt. He must step forward to halt, not back to halt.

27 Hacking up hills will help with fitness and muscle development.

28 In walk, try not to interfere too much and remember that during a test, a long walk on a free rein is not a time for a break! It requires as much attention and concentration as the other movements.

29 Don’t rush your schooling and ask for too much, too soon. It’s important that your horse is strong enough to be able to do what you’re asking him to do, or he could suffer injury. It normally takes four to five years to get to Grand Prix level, without any problems along the way, as it takes that long for the horse to become strong enough to perform the movements required at that level. If you have any setbacks, it can take longer and often does.

30 When you stop and salute the judge at a competition, remember to smile!?

31 Get to a show in plenty of time and hack your horse around the showground on a loose rein, so he has time to get used to his surroundings before he is expected to concentrate.

32 Plenty of turnout allows your horse time to relax and he’ll be more relaxed during his training.

33 At competitions, wear clothes and tack that you and your horse are used to and comfortable in. Suddenly using different equipment on competition day can affect your performance. If you have special show boots and tack, have a few dress rehearsals at home just before the show date.

34 The key to training horses is patience and consistency – you will get there!

35 If possible, recreate the type of arena you’ll be riding your test in at the competition and have a practice in it. For example, check what size the arena will be and measure one out the same size at home to practise the test in, or if you usually work in a school, but the competition is on grass, practise riding the test on grass.

Friday, July 5, 2013

Champion In The Making

You know you want to.... Stop by the ranch for a test drive and let's talk about your next Champion.

Fact Fiday

Fact Friday: It's a good, to have a good day.

Thursday, July 4, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: The horse has two teachers, the rider and the coach. If the rider is weak or faulty, you have to correct them first, so that the two of you can address the horse better. The horse cannot work better then what the rider allows. - Charles de Kunffy

Wednesday, July 3, 2013

Reining Made Easy "The Spin" with Steve Kutie

      Reining Made Easy “The Spin” with Steve Kutie
Steve Kutie began his career training Dressage horses on Ohio, later moving to Texas and making the transition to Reining and Cow horses. Steve’s training operation has includes youth and non pro riders competing at local, state and national levels in a variety of disiplines including: Hunt Seat, Rail and Pattern Classes, Reining, Dressage and more. In addition to training and instrustion, Steve is a respected judge and sought after clinician. Don’t be surprised to find Steve in the show pen either! Steve’s horses and students are all started with the principles of classical Dressage. It’s his belief this classical foundation carries over into each and every riding disipline- including just riding for pleasure! Steve now brings his popular clinics and instruction straight to you with this  “Made Easy”  series of DVD’s covering numerous aspects of riding and training.Whether you’re trying to get the most from your Reining horse or are interested on the finer points of Western Pleasure, learn from a charismatic, master instructor how easy training and riding your horse can be. Teaching your horse to spin is a super easy to follow step by step DVD that starts with teaching a green horse the basic cross over step, then moves to perfecting the maneuver on an intermediate horse and finishes with putting the polish on your show horse.
$39.99

Horse Vacation

What does former KPH graduate and IALHA National High Point Champion, IF Michaelangelo do when he's not in training? He goes trail riding back home in Idaho with his owner Janet Lee-Parker.

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: In my house I'm the boss, my wife is just the decision maker.

Tuesday, July 2, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: Consider using a round bale, turning it on it's end and stuffing hay nets. Most round bales contain roughly 16-20 square bales, so figure; $50 per roll divided by 16 = $2.12, compared to 16 bales x $6 = $96, a savings of $46 almost double!

Monday, July 1, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: Success consists of going failure to failure, without a loss of enthusiasm. And becoming an overnight success usually takes about 38 years.

Friday, June 28, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: The only way to train a horse, is accept what he is giving you and guide them toward your goal. - Steve Kutie

Thursday, June 27, 2013

Sponsor Spotlight: JW Books Custom Hat Company

"J.W. Brooks is a hat maker that does not just turn out another cowboy hat.  Each hat is a work of art.  Each custom hat is crafted by western artist, J.W. Brooks,dedicated toward perfection of quality, style, look and feel with a concentration on the significance of true western individualism. He believes even though cowboys and western heritage seem to be classed under one heading, the true meanings are defined by the individual character and his or her own style. With millions of people throughout the years, separating themselves from everyone else by even the slightest modification to one of the most historical icons through history, the cowboy hat has no limitations. With only your imagination being the limit, there is no one else to trust in your pursuit of style than JW Brooks."

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: Handling emotions is the hardest part of training. People get frustrated and get rough on their horses instead of realizing that they just haven't taught their horses. - Russell Dilday

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: Another drawback, specific to dealing with Zombies, is that horses are notoriously spooked by the undead. Even the scent of a Zombie, carried by the wind and maybe miles from the source, will be enough to send most horses into hysterics. - Zombie Survival Guide
Prepare for the future today Kutie Performance Horses will have a training spot open July, 1 be safe rather than sorry, your life may depend on it. Don't let the undead or the un-broke ruin your day.

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Saddles Gone Wild



 One of the reasons people come to us to build their saddle is that they know that whatever they want they can get. And some folks like things that are different from the general run of the mill, look alike saddle.

...The customer for this saddle is in to Celtic knot and the whole Celtic imagery. He had a design inside a men's ring that he wanted us to use on the skirts and back housing. He wanted a fire spitting dragon and he wanted a dragon bordering his seat jockey. He wanted something that looked like dragon scales. What I have pictured is our attempt to satisfy the customer in what he wanted his one of a kind saddle to look like.

Sometimes it is enough just to be different.

Check out our other saddles on our Jerry Shaw Custom Saddles Face book page or our web site at www.jshawsaddles.com/
See More

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: Always work on the hardest thing first, that way you can always finish on a good note. Remember; happy horse, happy rider.

Monday, June 24, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: You start to become a horseman when you realize it's your fault, not your horses.

Friday, June 21, 2013

Sponsor Spotlight: Kold-Rite Compression Therapy Wraps

KOLD-RITE Compression Wraps are made of stretchable polyurethane foam that is saturated with a 96% water based gel that cools at room temperature. The gel-imbedded wrap evaporates water to simultaneously provide moist, penetrating, cooling action and compression.
General Information
Since it is water based; the wrap requires only cool water to regenerate for numerous uses. Kold-Rite works at room temperature or may be refrigerated to enhance its cooling properties. Also, Kold-Rite is reusable making it very cost effective and affordable for your clients. In fact, the three steps to Kold-Rite are Wrap, Rehydrate, and Reuse. That is why Kold-Rite is gaining popularity with sport horse trainers and owners of all disciplines.

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: The moment of victory is much too short to live for that and nothing else. - Martina Navratilova  So enjoy the ride!

Thursday, June 20, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: Tell me I forget, Teach me and I remember, Involve me and I learn. - Ben Franklin

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

For parents who complain about the cost of horses

For parents who complain about the cost of horses

Very often we hear parents at the riding school complain about the cost of horses. While we know they eat a hole in the pocket, a father recently shared why he forks out for the animals. We’ve copied this from Facebook and definitely think you’ll enjoy the read:
My daughter turned sixteen years old today; which is a milestone for most people. Besi...des looking at baby photos and childhood trinkets with her, I took …time to reflect on the young woman my daughter had become and the choices she would face in the future.
As I looked at her I could see the athlete she was, and determined woman she would soon be. I started thinking about some of the girls we knew in our town who were already pregnant, pierced in several places, hair every color under the sun, drop outs, drug addicts and on the fast track to no-where, seeking surface identities because they had no inner self esteem. The parents of these same girls have asked me why I “waste” the money on horses so my daughter can ride. I’m told she will grow out of it, lose interest, discover boys and all kinds of things that try to pin the current generation’ s “slacker” label on my child. I don’t think it will happen, I think she will love and have horses all her life.
Because my daughter grew up with horses she has compassion. She knows that we must take special care of the very young and the very old. We must make sure those without voices to speak of their pain are still cared for.
Because my daughter grew up with horses she learned responsibility for others than herself. She learned that regardless of the weather you must still care for those you have the stewardship of. There are no “days off” just because you don’t feel like being a horse owner that day. She learned that for every hour of fun you have there are days of hard slogging work you must do first.
Because my daughter grew up with horses she learned not to be afraid of getting dirty and that appearances don’t matter to most of the breathing things in the world we live in. Horses do not care about designer clothes, jewelry, pretty hairdos or anything else we put on our bodies to try to impress others. What a horse cares about are your abilities to work within his natural world, he doesn’t care if you’re wearing $80.00 jeans while you do it. -
Because my daughter grew up with horses she understands the value of money. Every dollar can be translated into bales of hay, bags of feed or farrier visits. Purchasing non-necessities during lean times can mean the difference between feed and good care, or neglect and starvation. She has learned to judge the level of her care against the care she sees provided by others and to make sure her standards never lower, and only increase as her knowledge grows.
Because my daughter grew up with horses she has learned to learn on her own. She has had teachers that cannot speak, nor write, nor communicate beyond body language and reactions. She has had to learn to “read” her surroundings for both safe and unsafe objects, to look for hazards where others might only see a pretty meadow. She has learned to judge people as she judges horses. She looks beyond appearances and trappings to see what is within.
Because my daughter grew up with horses she has learned sportsmanship to a high degree. Everyone that competes fairly is a winner. Trophies and ribbons may prove someone a winner, but they do not prove someone is a horseman. She has also learned that some people will do anything to win, regard-less of who it hurts. She knows that those who will cheat in the show ring will also cheat in every other aspect of their life and are not to be trusted.
Because my daughter grew up with horses she has self-esteem and an engaging personality. She can talk to anyone she meets with confidence, because she has to express herself to her horse with more than words. She knows the satisfaction of controlling and teaching a 1000 pound animal that will yield willingly to her gentle touch and ignore the more forceful and inept handling of those stronger than she is. She holds herself with poise and professionalism in the company of those far older than herself.
Because my daughter grew up with horses she has learned to plan ahead. She knows that choices made today can effect what happens five years down the road. She knows that you cannot care for and protect your investments without savings to fall back on. She knows the value of land and buildings. And that caring for your vehicle can mean the difference between easy travel or being stranded on the side of the road with a four horse trailer on a hot day.
When I look at what she has learned and what it will help her become, I can honestly say that I haven’t “wasted” a penny on providing her with horses. I only wish that all children had the same opportunities to learn these lessons from horses before setting out on the road to adulthood.

(via Debbie Barke)

Manure Spreader For Sale

It is a really nice Chariot Manure Spreader.  It sells for $3500 new and I am asking $1500.  Three years old and barn kept....

phariss@embarqmail.com

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: If the world was truly a rational place, men would ride side saddle. - Rita Mae Brown

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Wanted: Barn Cat

Ok, my supplier for hood barn cats decided to get greedy with her stash, and keep them all for herself. Sooooooo, I'm currently looking for 2-3 ghetto barn cats that will actually kill mice, birds ,rats, maybe a squirrel every now and then, but they cannot kill my dogs! If you know of any let me know, Homie. Peace...Out

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. - Albert Einstein

Thursday, June 13, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: Trust in God, but tie your horse.

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: When you add personal discipline to a commitment toward open-mindedness you increase your chance of success. The choice to be disciplined is the choice of winners. - Bob Avila

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: Horse training is a game of patience. - Steve Kutie

Monday, June 10, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: Your true value depends on what your compared to. - Bob Wells

Friday, June 7, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: Confidence is preparation, everything else is beyond your control.

Thursday, June 6, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: If it's important to you, you will find a way, otherwise you will find an excuse.

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: Do or do not. There is no try. - Yoda

Tuesday, June 4, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: At some point during the training process your going to have to ask for more than your horse is capable, to find his limits/potential. Nothing is worse than a horse or rider that has all-star ability that is unused.

Monday, June 3, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: Believe in yourself, have faith in your abilities! Without a humble but reasonable confidence in your own powers, you cannot be successful or happy. - Norman Vincent Peale

Friday, May 31, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: If you think education is expensive, try ignorance.

Thursday, May 30, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: Don't put your responsibility with other people, like the judges. Have you done your utmost best, have you done everything? If so, you never lose. - Tjalling Van de Berg/ pertaining to being personally fit and in shape to improve your riding.

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: Discipline, is remembering what you want.

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Win a Free Anti-Gimmick Training Clinic

Win a FREE Steve Kutie Anti-Gimmick Training Clinic at your Farm or Ranch. All you need to do is send me the most creative(Video, pic, note, etc..) idea of why you and your ranch/friends or group deserve to have an Anti-Gimmick Training Clinic. Post you entry on the Kutie Performance Horses Facebook page. All entries are be due by June 30, 2013. The more creative the idea the better your chance to win, dare to be different. One winner will be picked on July 1, 2013 by our expert panel of experts, consisting of Charissa and Jax. Feel free to share this with anyone that might be interested.
Small print: Winner will be responsible for actual travel costs to get me to the clinic, and make sure that I get feed and have a place to sleep. If you are a club, group, organization or non profit you are able to charge people to attend and use the money to help your cause. The actual cost of hosting the clinic is FREE!

New from ReinersWear and Snaffle Bit Clothing Co.

ReinersWear Slide Baby Slide graphic tee, $19.99 plus shipping.

Sponsor Spotlight: Cutter Classic Saddle Blanket Co.

Try a layer of pure Merino wool fleece between you and your horse and make your life easier by making your horses' lives easier. Quit worrying about sore backs, saddles slipping, shifting, or rocking sideways. Cutter Classic Saddle Blankets feature 100% Merino wool fleece under a wide variety of patterns and solid colored wool blankets in many colors. Add to that leather wear-leathers and a layer of breathable, antimicrobial hospital-bed padding in between. these pads softly mold to your horse's back. They don't soak up sweat and are easily sprayed clean with water. And they last for years. Ask anyone who's been around the cutting pen awhile and you'll likely hear "Oh yeah, I've had one for years and still use it all the time." They've been hard to find of late but we recently bought the company and are making them again.

Teh Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: Knowledge is power; Being able to understand how your horse moves, functions, and thinks is the only true way to improve your riding and training skills. Gimmicks and short cuts will only result in causing yourself frustration and more work in the end, usually never curing the issue or problem. Understanding horses and horsemanship will not only save you money and keep your tack room less cluttered, it will teach you how to use your brain, your most important tool. Remember the more band-aids you apply to a cut will not make it heal faster, they only serve to cover up the problem and make you feel better.

Monday, May 27, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: A great man is hard on himself, a small man is hard on others. - Confucius

Friday, May 24, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: If your parents never had children, chances are you won't either.

Thursday, May 23, 2013

Hanging with Dr. Tobias Funke


Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday:  Always have respect for yourself and your horse.

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: Don't criticize; Teach, Share, Learn. Be the cure not the problem. - Steve Kutie

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: Just remember that no matter how bad you think that you have it, someone has it a bit worse.       
     In the wake of the recent tornado in Oklahoma it is import to keep in mind that no matter your race, religion, or ethnicity that we are all human and sometimes it is best to put our personal feelings and beliefs on the shelf and become a friend or shoulder to lean on. After all we are all here due to someone's LOVE, and LOVE is the one thing transcends all boundaries.

Monday, May 20, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: One mans wrong lead, is another's counter canter.

Friday, May 17, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: One of my biggest pet peeves is when horse people try to tell me that their horse can't do something, do to the fact they were trained either Western or English. All it really tells me is that their horse is not truly broke enough to do what is ask of him. A properly trained and truly broke horse will obey what is ask of him by his rider. And a properly trained rider will be able to ask and influence the horse to perform the task at hand, no matter the costume he is wearing. Good training will always be good training, period.

Question of the Week

Steve Kutie's, Anti-Gimmick Training Question of the Week: I have heard people say that learning to ride your horse bare back/saddle less is a great way to improve your seat and balance, what are your thoughts?

Thursday, May 16, 2013

Stop Kicking The Horse

Too often, riders are determined to make their horses go with a swift kick or two (or three). At best, the horse lurches forward with arched back and raised neck, scrambling to get his legs underneath him despite being thrown to the forehand. At worst, the horse becomes resentful of the leg aid and learns to resist or even demonstrate his discomfort by kicking out, rearing or bucking.
Did you know that leg aids are used for more than just “go”? Leg aids are such an integral part of your ride that you simply can’t do without them!
As you become a better rider, you will discover that the legs have so many messages to communicate other than “go”. (Click here to tweet this if you agree)
Talk to different riders and they’ll tell you the various uses of leg aids. Here are a few examples:

1. Impulsion

The most important result coming from your leg aids is impulsion. Ideally, the lightest calf squeeze should communicate an increase in movement from your horse. Two legs squeezing at the same time ask for a “scoot forward”, causing the horse to tuck his hind under and releas a surge of energy forward. Physiologically, the horse’s hind legs should step deeper underneath the body and allow the horse to begin the process of carrying more weight in the hind end.

2. Stride Length

Ideally, a deeper reach should mean a rounder back and an increase in stride length. Paired with half-halts, the energy obtained can be redirected in many ways – to a longitudinal stretch over the back, to a higher head and neck elevation or to more animated action through the entire body.
One leg can be used to create a deeper hind leg stride on that side of the horse. Theoretically, you could influence just one hind leg with the corresponding leg aid.

3. Bend

Use of one leg aid should encourage your horse to move away from that pressure. True bend (i.e. not a neck bend) should always begin at the seat, be reinforced by the leg, and then be contained with the reins.

4. Hind end position

Using your leg behind the girth should indicate that the hind end steps away from that pressure. Use of your outside leg behind the girth encourages the horse to work into a haunches in (“travers”) position. Using your inside leg behind the girth is the key to the renvers, when the horse bends to the outside of the direction of movement.

5. Keep Moving

Two legs used at the same time mean “keep doing what you were doing”. This understanding is essential for movement such as the back-up, where the reins should be the last factor in the movement, and the legs (and seat) the first. Ideally, the horse should continue backing up without increased rein pressure until your legs soften and your seat asks for a halt.

6. Lift the Back

A gentle heel or spur lifting action underneath the rib cage should encourage the horse to lift his back. Of course, this aid is used in conjunction with the seat and hands but the legs can be an effective motivator for the horse to lift his rib cage and “round” in the movement.

7. Lateral Movement

The positioning of your inside leg at the girth and outside leg behind the girth should combine to indicate a lateral movement. Where your seat goes and how your hands finish the movement will differentiate the shoulder-fore from the shoulder-in from the leg yield from the half-pass. With the exception of the leg yield, your legs position in a way that encourages inside bend and catch the outside hind end (from swinging out). Finally, the horse will proceed to step in the direction of movement if that is required.

Give Up On Kicking!

Kicking your horse only stuns, disturbs, imbalances, and hurts. Although kicking might be a useful way to start out for a beginning rider, once you have better balance in your seat and a more consistent contact with the bit, aim toward using your legs with more purpose.
Learn how to use your legs in the rhythm of the movement. Working against the movement only serves to irritate the horse because he simply cannot respond if the timing is out of sync with the footfalls. Good, effective leg aids work within the movement and are generally not noticeable. Great legs look like they are doing nothing at all.
In all cases, the essential thing you need to do is to keep soft, loose legs draped gently on your horse’s side. In this manner, the legs are kind, responsive, clear and secure. The horse knows he can rely on the communication he is receiving from the leg aids, and with repetition, will know just what to do when!

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: In good training, you never see the rider doing anything. Yanking, spurring and kicking on a horse only goes to show the inexperience/ignorance of the rider. - Steve Kutie

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Weekly Bonus Tip: How to survive and ride in the extreme heat


How to survive and ride in the extreme heat



Well if you happen to live in the south during the summer you know that it can get a tad on the warm side. With Texas experiencing the hottest year on record since the early 80’s, trying to find creative ways to keep your horse safe and cool in the heat become a priority. I have compiled a list of safety do’s and don’ts. Common sense in the most valuable piece of info I can offer, if it is way to hot for you to be out, it’s way to hot for you to be out riding your horse.



1. Know the signs of heat exhaustion. In horses, symptoms include weakness, stumbling, increased temperature (higher than 102 F) and elevated pulse or respiration. In serious cases, a horse may stop sweating (anhidrosis).

2. Remember that you need to scrape off the excess water from your horse after he is hosed off. Water works as a layer of insulation holding in the heat causing the horse to over-heat faster than just plan sweating.

3. Work your horse in shorter training sessions giving him plenty of time to air back up and cool off. Look for a shady spot to let him recover.

4. If you are planning to ride for a longer period of time offer your horse a small drink of water through out the training session. REMEMBER that you also need to drink.

5. If you horse is over weight work him as little as possible in the extreme heat since layers of fat increase that amount of time it takes for the blood to make it to the surface for cooling.

6. Provide electrolytes. Add electrolytes to your horse's water when you know he'll be working hard in the heat. Begin a few days ahead of time--electrolytes leach water from his system, and he'll need time to adjust his water intake to compensate. Offer him non-supplemented water as well, since he might not like the taste of electrolytes.

7. If possible allow your horse to cool down in front of a fan. Air moving across a wet body will evaporate and cool your horse. A cheap box fan from the local store will do the job.

8. Be smart and try to schedule your ride times early in the morning or late in the evening when the temperatures are at their coolest. The sun and heat levels are at their most dangerous levels from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm.

9. A 50/50 mixture of rubbing alcohol and water in a spray bottle will help to cool your horse do to the evaporative nature of the alcohol.

10. Look out for your own safety; Wear light weight and light colored clothing, drink plenty of water, apply sunscreen.



Always remember. Be Safe, Ride Hard, Have Fun - Steve Kutie

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: Remember less is more when asking a horse to perform, as riders we tend to stand in the way of our own progress.

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: Worry less about how high or low your horses head is, and start worrying about leaving your horse alone. His head and neck will relax when you stop picking at him.

Monday, May 13, 2013

Anti-Gimmick Trail Clinic Burnet, Texas

Steve Kutie Anti-Gimmick Trail Clinic
Where: Blue Bonnet Arena Burnet, Texas
When: May24-26

Private lessons focusing on your individual needs for yourself & your horse are available by appointment on Friday afternoon beginning @ 2 p.m.The private lesson cost is $60. Email bluebonnet.arena@yahoo.com or call Thelma 979-299-5210. The Ranch Versatility Clinic will refine your riding skills as you gain insight into problems you may be experiencing with your horse. It begins @ 9 a.m. on Saturday. Enrollment is limited to 20 riders. Pre-register on our website > bluebonnetarena.com for a special clinic fee of $100. On Saturday, fee is the full price of $125. The emphasis on TRAIL will earn points for you in competition & you will have a great time working traditional TRAIL obstacles in the arena followed by a ride through more natural elements in the Bluebonnet pasture.

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: You see in life, lots of people know what to do, but few people actually do what they know. Knowing is not enough! You must take action. - Anthony Robbins

Friday, May 10, 2013

Morning Gate Crew


Fact Friday

Fact Friday: The difference between stupidity and genius, is that genius has it's limits. - Albert Einstein

Thursday, May 9, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: Great minds have purpose, others have wishes. - Washington Earving

Successful Living


Successful Living


Up early in the morning

Long before the sun

Squinting through your tired eyes

There's lots of work to be done

 

The horses all need feeding

It's time to check the cows

Flip on the arena lights

It's time to eat some chow


Others are still sleeping

As you pull your cinch up tight

This crazy life your living

Never seems quite right


The work is never ending

And most won't understand

The simple life your leading

Chasing your grand plan


Their eyes are always on you

As you pull your hat down tight

Your working for a living

Trying to do what's right


The horses are all worked

And your pant legs soaked with sweat

As you sit there thinking to yourself

How much better could this get


While others shuffle papers

Sitting at their desks

Your sitting saddled on your horse

Watching that pretty ol' sunset


Now your day is finished

As you stumble back through the door

You have that funny feeling

That you've done this all before


All the hours baking in the sun

You know what they were for

When you see those smiling faces

Waiting for you at the door


Their always glad to see you

They don't care about the score

You're number one in their book

It's daddy they adore


You'll do it again tomorrow

That crazy life you lead

To put food on the table

For your loving family


Now success is real subjective

And money's not the score

But a loving wife and family

Is something I adore.


- Steve Kutie


Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Sponsor Spotlight; Jerry Shaw Custom Saddles

As a CUSTOM SADDLE MAKER from Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas, we build high quality handcrafted custom saddles and tack for everything you can do “western” on a horse. Whether you are a cowboy or cowgirl at heart or one who earns a living horseback, you’ll enjoy visiting our SADDLE GALLERIES of uniquely beautiful but undeniably serviceable tools of the cowboy trade. Whatever your chosen discipline or riding style, you’ll find the saddle of your dreams from one of our galleries.

Hopefully, you didn’t come to the Jerry Shaw Custom Saddles web site expecting to find the typical, ordinary, hum-drum saddles so common in today’s market place. As you will soon see, there is nothing ordinary about our extraordinary works of art. Each saddle is carefully designed, skillfully assembled, and masterfully finished using only the finest and highest quality materials available. Each of our saddles is individually handcrafted with one type of buyer in mind. . . the discriminating horseman or horsewoman who demands the very best for themselves and insists on the very best of equipment for their horses.


To visit with Jerry and check out more of his AWESOME Custom Creations head to www.jshawsaddles.com

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: Always ride with a game plan in mind. I believe that I teach a horse more in the warm-up/cool down than during the actual "training" session. Reason being, that if my game plan was to work on lead changes and while warming up I noticed that my horse was not moving his shoulder over, I can pretty much bet that I will have trouble getting my horse to properly change leads. I don't want to set myself or my horse up for failure so I will work on freeing up the shoulders more during the warm up and skip the lead changes for the day. Remember that a soft, supple, relaxed and willing horse will always be trainable. When you fix a problem and your horse understands QUIT! There is no rule in the horse world that states you must ride your horse at least 1 hour per day, always try work smarter not harder.

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: The horse is the best judge of a good rider, not the spectator. If a horse has a high opinion of the rider, he will let himself be guided, if not he will resist. - Nuno Oliveria

Monday, May 6, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: Wake Up, Kick Ass, Repeat!

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: Thousands of geniuses live and die undiscovered - either by themselves or by others. - Mark Twain

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: When the going gets tough; Shut up, do your job and work harder.

Monday, April 22, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work. - Thomas Edison

Friday, April 19, 2013


Fact Friday

Fact Friday: Those who are skilled in combat do not become angered, those who are skilled in winning do not become afraid. Thus the wise win before the fight, while the ignorant fight to win. - O Sensei Ueshiba

Thursday, April 18, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: If you make things simple, then it's easier for your horse and you to do them consistently. Always remember the K.I.S.S method; Keep It Simple Stupid. Albert Einstein said If you cannot explain something simply, you do not understand it well enough.

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: Set the example, don't be one.

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: If it bothers you to take a loss on a horse, think of what you will be able to save in time every month that you're not paying for his upkeep. The balance- in time as well as the dollars saved - can pencil out to the good in fairly short order. - Bob Avila

Monday, April 15, 2013

Anti-Gimmick Trail Clinic

Charissa and I would like to thank everyone for coming out to a very successful, fun and sold out Anti-Gimmick Trail Clinic at Kutie Performance Horses. Our Next Anti-Gimmick Training Clinic will be July 13, 2013 from 9am-5pm here at the ra...nch in Bowie Texas. The Clinic will focus on all of the training basics, getting your horse more broke and responsive in the morning with a free lunch followed by refining the skills learned in the morning session and how to apply them to improve your scores in the show ring or just to improve your riding enjoyment. Please pre-register so that you will guarantee your spot, clinic is run on a first pay basis and will be limited to 15 riders, auditors are welcome for $25(lunch included). Contact us at WEB: www.SteveKutie.com, E-Mail: SteveKutie@gmail.com, CELL: 940-841-0885

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: The most effective way to do it, is to do it. - Amelia Earhart

Friday, April 12, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: Thinking, a great way to figure things out.

Thursday, April 11, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: It is not what people are willing to do to achieve their goals that keep them from achieving their goals. It is that they are not clear in defining what they are willing to give up.

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger.

Tuesday, April 9, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday:

Tech Tip Tuesday: Knowledge is power; Being able to understand how your horse moves, function and thinks is the only way to truly improve your riding and training skills. Gimmicks and shortcuts will only result in causing yourself frustrations and more work in the end, usually never curing the issue or problem. Understanding horses and horsemanship will not only save you time and money but also keep your tack room less cluttered. In addition, it will teach you how to use your brain, your most important tool. Remember the more band-aids you apply to a cut will not make it heal any faster, they only serve to cover up the problem and make YOU feel better.

Monday, April 8, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: The only people that never fail, are those who never try.

Friday, April 5, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: Good communication is the key to a successful relationship between/owners.

Thursday, April 4, 2013

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: 95% of horse problems, are people problems.

Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: Never cut corners or try to save money on the tack and equipment that will effect your life, such as; reins, headstalls or cinches. Your life is more valuable than saving $20 on a pair of reins.


Tuesday, April 2, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: Always remember that a lead change does not necessarily equal a change of direction. And that one persons wrong lead is another persons counter canter.

Monday, April 1, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: Today I will do what others won't, so tomorrow I can accomplish what other can't. - Jerry Rice

Friday, March 29, 2013

Weekly Bonus Tip: Choosing the Proper Headstall

Choosing the Proper Headstall for a Snaffle Bit & Correct fit




I have always noticed the small things that people tend to do when it comes to their horses and their choice of equipment, and I have to ask myself, “Do they not know or do they just not care?” Watching people ride in the warm up at a recent show I noticed the number of riders that have the improper headstall for the bit that they are using. Headstalls were designed with a specific purpose in mind, to keep the bit hanging in the proper position in your horse’s mouth and to allow you to pull on the reins and not have the headstall slip over their ears.



The hardest to thing to overlook, from a safety standpoint is when one is riding a horse around with a snaffle bit hung on a headstall that has no throat latch. When pulling on the reins, a headstall that has no throat latch and brow band will tend to lift off of the horse’s poll and possibly slip off over their ears. The throat latch and brow band is designed to keep the headstall in the proper position by securing it behind the horses jaw and across the forehead just in front of the ears. The throat latch should be adjusted with 2-3 fingers width between it and the horses throat latch.



If using a bit that has leverage, a one ear or split ear headstall will be fine since they are being used with a curb chain. The leverage bit, when pulled on, rocks forward in the horse’s mouth. This allows the curb chain to apply pressure under the chin and slight pressure over the horse’s poll, keeping the headstall in place.



Also for the sake of safety, I like to ride all of my snaffle bits with a slobber strap attached to each ring that runs under the horses chin. This is so I am able to pull the bit left or right without having the rings slide around into the horse’s mouth where we lose control. I will also tend to ride all of my horses with a cavasson or nose band to keep them from gapping their mouth open and trying to get away from the bit pressure. The nose band is not used to keep the horses mouth tied shut; it is just an aid that allows the bit to function properly without allowing any bad habits to start. It is always easier to keep a problem from starting than to have to go back and figure out how to correct it.



Proper fit for a snaffle bit depends on the horse’s mouth conformation. I will start a colt in the round pen with the bit hanging a little lower in the horse’s mouth so that the colt learns how to carry the bit with their tongue. Once I start riding I will pull the bit up so that I have 1-2 slight wrinkles on each corner of the colt’s mouths.



Remember that there is no perfect bit, the bit is only as good as the riders hands that are using it.



As Always; Ride Hard, Be Safe, Have Fun. – Steve Kutie

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: Always forgive your horse for all of their mistakes, after all they forgive all of yours.

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: You start to become a horseman when you realize it's your fault, not your horses.

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: 90% of the time, people use draw reins as a crutch to try and teach a horse to hold his head down on his own. I haven't seen anyone that was successful at that. - Bob Avila

Monday, March 25, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: People too weak to follow their own dreams, will always find a way to discourage yours.


Friday, March 22, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: It has long since come to my attention that people of accomplishment rarely sat back and let things happen to them, they went out and happened to things. - Leonardo DaVinci

Thursday, March 21, 2013

Weekly Bonus Tip; Getting the most out of your lesson

GETTING THE MOST OUT OF YOUR RIDING LESSON








Question: I pay $50 per hour for my riding lesson, how do I get the most bang for my buck?



Answer: Most professional trainers are providing you with the opportunity to gain valuable information. However, it is your job to listen to what they have to say and implement that knowledge on your horse. Riding and training a horse does not come with an instruction book detailing a program that will work with every horse. Be sure that when your trainer asks if you have any questions that you be honest with them. It is your hard earned money that has bought you the chance to ask a professional questions. If you don’t completely understand what is being taught, ask them to explain in greater detail. The only dumb questions are the ones that you never ask. I always encourage my clients to ask questions and to question me when they are in doubt. I would rather take the time to go slow and make sure they understand than to speed past something that I thought they understood, only to go back and keep fixing the same problem over and over. It wastes my time and their money.

Be respectful of you trainers time. Remember that this is his or her job and they may have other commitments that need to be taken care of after your lesson. When I was running a larger lesson program, I liked to have my customers at my facility early enough to have their horses tacked, warmed up, and ready to ride when the lesson began. If your lesson time is 1:00-2:00, try to be there half an hour early so that you can be ready to start at 1:00, and not 1:30. In my program you will still be finished at 2:00, no matter what time we started and still pay for the whole hour. Remember, just because you are running late, it doesn’t mean that the next lesson is.

Be sure to work on the homework that you trainer gives you so that you will be prepared for your next lesson. While at home, keep a small note pad in the barn. If you think of a question while riding on your own, you will have the pad close to write down your question, rather than trying to remember what you wanted to ask during you lesson time.

You might also be able to save some money and learn more by having a group lesson with some friends. Taking a lesson with friends will allow you to gain an extra set of eyes when you are at home training; they will have an understanding of what you are trying to accomplish. Having a friend or family member video during the lesson will provide you with ability to review what you worked on during the lesson.

Remember that it is your job to get the most out of your lesson, only you know what you don’t know.



As always; Ride Hard, Be Safe and Have Fun. - Steve Kutie

Theory Thursday

Theory Thursday: There is only one correct answer to all questions in horsemanship. It depends on the horse.

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: It's what you learn after you know it all that's important. - Jimmy Williams

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Thought for the Day

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: Those who say it cannot be done shouldn't interrupt the people doing it.

Monday, March 18, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: The difference between a succussful person and another, is not the lack of strength, not a lack of knowledge, but rather a lack of will. - Vince Lombardi

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Wisdom Wednesday: The best way to appreciate how another person rides, is to get on their horse

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Tech Tip Tuesday

Tech Tip Tuesday: When it comes to training there is no right or wrong in terms of technique. Training has to be what works for you and what your horse understands. Training is all about consistency and always asking the question the same everytime, while rewarding him for trying, or giving the correct answer. If you teach your horse to pick up the left lead by pulling on his left ear and you are consistant with your aids and your horse responds willing, that IS training, it's not very marketable or practical, but it is training.

Monday, March 11, 2013

Motivation Monday

Motivation Monday: Many of lifes failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up. - Thomas Edison

Friday, March 8, 2013

Fact Friday

Fact Friday: It is not the bit that can be harsh or severe, but instead the hands that are behind it. - Steve Kutie

Thursday, March 7, 2013

OPK; Other Peoples Kids

Sitting in the hospital watching Charissa being prepped for delivery I cannot help but think about the words that I had always muttered, "I hate kids!" It seems like poetic justice that we are having our second little bundle of joy early this morning. The thought of having any more kids will be of no more concern after the delivery, unless it is through immaculant conception, which I'm sure that we are safe since Charissa is no longer a virgin, except in the eyes of her mom and dad, and God sometimes questions my skewed sense of Religious Politics by having me toil away in this world of purgatory called horse training.

On the drive to the hospital this morning, at the butt crack of dawn, my mind was thinking about how I wandered down this crazy path of having kids at 40 along with the thoughts of how I still really hate kids, just not my own. I think it must have been some kind of a genetic defect on my part since everyone in my family has been really big fans of kids, having kids, and pretty much anything and everything related to kids. I, on the other hand, had never even held a baby until I had Jax and then they handed him to me wrapped up like a Chiptole burrito and said "follow me". I will admit that I was pretty dazed and confused about the whole process and scared crapless about having to care and provide for someone other than myself. I had thoughts of being the old guy at all of the school events where I was old enough to be most of their grandpa's. Now I just have thoughts of being 60 years old when I might finally be able to slow down a bit and relax; I just hope the slowdown is not caused by the result of arthritis or a broken hip. Now I need to make it clear that I don't personally "hate" your kids, unless they cause harm to one of mine.

Going to the daycare to pick up Jax takes all of my strength and courage just to open the door. All of the kids are running around like a bunch of Spider monkeys hyped up on Mountian Dew at a Greatful Day concert. Snot dripping from their crusty noses, staring at me through their squinted matted eyes, and coughing all of their antibiotic resistant germs into the air that I'm going to breathe. Holding your breath will not work, I've tried. All that happens is you turn blue, your eyes roll back in your head, and you wake up as a jungle gym for 27 grass stomping ankle biters. I'm sure that all of your kids are angels that never do wrong and obey the rules as if they were newbies at boot camp. But I know better; I have seen them when your not around, and it's not the stuff a Hallmark movie is made of, more like Poltergeist. So if you would like your kids to be perfect, well behaved little angel,s you are more than welcome to use my two kids as examples. They have learned their class and style from their dad, so most of your kids will benefit from the lessons learned. Now you know that I am just playing. I love all kids, except for a couple who shall remain nameless.